NEUROSURGERY Report

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Ahead of Print: Anchoring Depth Electrodes for Bedside Removal

Background: Intracranial depth electrodes for epilepsy are easily dislodged during long-term monitoring unless adequately anchored, but a technique is not available that is both secure and allows for easy explantation without reopening the incision.

Objective: To describe a convenient and inexpensive method for anchoring depth electrodes that prevents migration and incidental pullout, while allowing for electrode removal at the bedside.

Methods: An easily breakable suture (e.g. monocryl) is tied around both the depth electrode and a heavy nylon suture and anchored to a hole at the edge of the burr hole; the tails of both are together tunneled percutaneously. The ‘break-away’ monocryl suture effectively anchors the electrode for as long as needed. At the completion of the intracranial EEG session, the two tails of the nylon suture are pulled to break their encompassing monocryl anchor suture, thus freeing the depth electrode for easy removal.

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Written by NEUROSURGERY® Editorial Office

May 1, 2012 at 7:58 AM

One Response

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  1. Yes, this is a very effective method.
    The only extra precaution to prevent any CSF leak is to run another galea-deep skin anchor at the exit point from the scalp. Then this should be reinforced with a skin adhesive like Dermabond.

    Jaliya Lokuketagoda, MD

    May 7, 2012 at 4:47 AM


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