Ahead of Print: Outcomes in Reoperated Low-Grade Gliomas

Screen Shot 2015-06-11 at 8.24.56 AMBACKGROUND: Low-grade gliomas (LGGs) comprise a diverse set of intrinsic brain tumors that correlate strongly with survival. Data on the effect of reoperation are sparse.

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of reoperation on patients with LGG.

METHODS: Fifty-two consecutive patients with reoperated LGGs treated at the University of Washington between 1986 and 2004 were identified and evaluated in a retrospective analysis.

RESULTS: The average overall survival (OS) for this cohort was 12.95 +/- 0.96 years. The overall 10-year survival rate was 57%. The absence of any residual tumor at either the first or second operation was associated with significantly increased OS, as was the use of procarbazine, lomustine, and vincristine chemotherapy. Negative prognostic variables for OS included the use of upfront radiation and pathology at recurrence. The average overall progression-free survival to the first recurrence (PFS1) was 6.23 +/- 0.51 years. Positive prognostic factors for improved PFS1 included the use of upfront radiation therapy. Variables not associated with differences in PFS1 included the use of upfront chemotherapy, enhancement, pathology, extent of resection, the presence of residual tumor, and Karnofsky Performance Scale score <80. The average overall progression-free survival to the second recurrence was 2.73 +/- 0.39 years. Pathology at recurrence was associated with significant differences in progression-free survival to the second recurrence, as was extent of resection at time of first recurrence, and Karnofsky Performance Scale score <80.

CONCLUSION: This is among the largest studies to assess variables associated with outcome in patients with reoperated LGG. Reresection appears to provide significant benefit, and extent of resection remains the strongest predictor of OS.

From: Outcomes in Reoperated Low-Grade Gliomas by Ramakrishna et al.

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